ECE6563 - Fall 2015
Networked Control Systems

Magnus Egerstedt

Phone
Email
Office
(404) 894-3484   
magnus@gatech.edu  
TSRB 432     

Office hours: Wednesdays 1-3 or by appointment

Teaching Assistant: TBD


A networked control system consists of dynamical units, or agents, that interact over a signal-exchange network for its coordinated operation and behavior. Such systems have found many applications in diverse areas of science and engineering, including multiple space, air, land, and underwater vehicles, energy and power systems, physiology, and medicine.

             



COURSE DESCRIPTION
Currently, significant research efforts are underway in the controls, systems, and communications communities to lay down a foundation for the analysis and control of networked systems. This course will provide an overview of the tools and techniques that have proven instrumental for studying networked control systems as well as outline potential research directions.

The course will be divided into five parts, corresponding to the following topics:

     (1) Network Models (graphs, random graphs, random geometric graphs, state-dependent graphs, switching networks)
     (2) Decentralized Control (limited computational, communications, and controls resources in networked control systems)
     (3) Multi-Agent Robotics (formation control, sensor and actuation models)
     (4) Mobile Sensor Networks (coverage control, Voronoi-based cooperation strategies)
     (5) LANdroids (mobile communications networks, connectivity maintenance)

COURSE WEBSITE
This page: /ece6563.html

WORKLOAD
Your responsibilities in this class will fall into two main categories:
1. The homework sets (one problem set roughly every third week, total of 5 homework sets) = 40% (HW 1-4: 5% each, HW5: 20%). The credit will be divided between programming assignments and theoretical exercises. The last homework will be project-based (simulation as well as a actual, remote-access multi-robot experiment) and will involve all the tools developed in the course, as shown below.

             


2. The midterm and final exams = 20% + 40% = 60% They will cover all the material presented in the class. They will be closed-book, closed-note, closed-calculator exams.

PROGRAMMING
The objective with the programming assignments is to see how to bridge the gap between what is done in class and how to actually apply it. The assignments will be Matlab-based.

READING
The course textbook is Mesbahi and Egerstedt, Graph Theoretic Methods in Multiagent Networks, Princeton University Press, 2010. (See http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9230.html.)
The textbook will be supplemented with some suggested reading material, e.g.,
Distributed Control of Robotic Networks, by F. Bullo, J. Cortes, and S. Martinez, Princeton, 2009.
Algebraic Graph Theory, by C. Godsil and G. Royle, Springer, 2001.
Networked Embedded Sensing and Control, edited by P. J. Antsaklis and P. Tabuada, Springer 2006.

TIME AND PLACE
The lectures will be held Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 11:00-12:00 in Clough Commons 102.

PREREQUISITS
There are no formal prerequsits beyond graduate standing, but some knowledge of linear algebra, linear control systems, and differential equations will certainly make your life a little easier. For example, ECE6550 would be the perfect background for this course.

HONOR CODE
Altough you are encouraged to work together to learn the course material, the exams and homeworks are expected to be completed individually. All conduct in this course will be governed by the Georgia Tech honor code.




SCHEDULE

 
Date Lecture subject Reading/Homework

Aug. 17 What are networked control systems? 1
Aug. 19 Rendezvous: A canonical problem 1

GRAPH-BASED NETWORK MODELS
Aug. 21 Graph theory: basics 2
Aug. 24 Algebraic and spectral graph theory 2
Aug. 26 Connectivity: Cheeger's inequality 2
Aug. 28 Proximity graphs 2

THE AGREEMENT PROTOCOL: STATIC CASE
Aug. 31 Reaching decentralized agreements 3
Sept. 2 Consensus equation: Static case 3
Sept. 4 Disagreement vectors 3, HW1 (graph theory)
Sept. 7 Labor Day - NO CLASS
Sept. 9 Directed networks 3
Sept. 11 Average consensus 3
Sept. 14 Leader networks and distributed estimation
Sept. 16 Discrete time consensus 3

THE AGREEMENT PROTOCOL: DYNAMIC CASE
Sept. 18 Switched networks 4, HW2 (static consensus)
Sept. 21 Lyapunov-based stability 4
Sept. 23 Consensus equation: Dynamic case 4,7
Sept. 25 Weighted protocols 6
Sept. 28 Energy-based design 6
Oct. 30 Connectivity maintenance 6
Oct. 2 Biological models: Flocking and swarming
Oct. 5 Alignment and Kuramoto's coupled oscillators
Oct. 7 Review
Oct. 9 MIDTERM
Oct. 12 Fall recess - NO CLASS

MULTI-AGENT ROBOTICS
Oct. 14 Formations 6
Oct. 16 Graph rigidity 6, HW3 (dynamic consensus)
Oct. 19 Persistence 6
Oct. 21 Formation control 6
Oct. 23 Design choices 6
Oct. 26 Leader-follower networks 10
Oct. 28 Network controllability 10
Oct. 30 Network feedback 10, HW4 (formation control)
Nov. 2 Distributed optimal control 10
Nov. 4 Human-swarm interactions
Nov. 6 Project briefing

MOBILE SENSOR AND COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
Nov. 9 Sensor networks: Coverage control 7
Nov. 11 Gabriel and Voronoi graphs 7
Nov. 13 Location costs 7
Nov. 16 Communication models 5
Nov. 18 Random graphs 5
Nov. 20 Random consensus 5
Nov. 23 Project presentations HW5 (project)
Nov. 25 Thanksgiving - NO CLASS
Nov. 27 Thanksgiving - NO CLASS
Nov. 30 LANdroids: Communication networks
Dec. 2 At the research frontier
Dec. 4 Review
Dec. 9 FINAL EXAM: 8:00-10:50